Woman who caused serious car accident may have been on heroin

During these unprecedented times, Clark, Perdue, & List Co, LPA is here to fully support your needs in a timely and safe manner. COVID-19 should not affect your ability to investigate a personal injury case. We currently remain open and are still accepting new cases. With your safety top of mind, we are scheduling all meetings via telephone or video conference at this time.

Drugs and alcohol impair drivers and otherwise inhibit their ability to operate a vehicle. One woman was recently arrested after apparently causing a multiple vehicle accident in which one person was seriously injured. The Ohio authorities suspect that she was under the influence of heroin at the time of the car accident.

The authorities hypothesize that around 3 p.m., the 35-year-old woman drove her car up to an intersection. However, she did not yield at the stop sign, causing her to crash into a second car and splitting that vehicle in two. One part of the second vehicle hit a UPS truck, and the other part collided with a school bus carrying the driver and 15 children.

While none of the children were injured, the driver of the second car that was split in half had to be airlifted to a local hospital because he was in critical condition. The driver of the first car and her passenger were arrested. A search of her vehicle revealed empty drug capsules, and the investigators are searching the area near the crash to see if any drugs were thrown out of the vehicle.

The exact Ohio criminal charges that the woman faces following the car accident remain unclear. Despite the criminal accusations, she could also face a personal injury suit if the man who was critically injured chooses to file one. The man could allege that her negligent actions caused him significant pain and suffering, and he could seek damages to reimburse him for any medical bills, lost wages and other financial losses incurred due to the crash.

Source: wdtn.com, “Driver arrested at the scene of crash on National Road“, David Robinson, Nov. 11, 2014