Wife files second civil suit, claims medical negligence

During these unprecedented times, Clark, Perdue, & List Co, LPA is here to fully support your needs in a timely and safe manner. COVID-19 should not affect your ability to investigate a personal injury case. We currently remain open and are still accepting new cases. With your safety top of mind, we are scheduling all meetings via telephone or video conference at this time.

A wife who lost her husband on Feb. 16 has filed a suit in civil court against multiple defendants. She claims that medical negligence led to the wrongful death of her husband. The Ohio woman is seeking more than $25,000 in damages for her loss.

According to the wife, the husband went to the doctor in May 2004 because he reportedly had blood in his urine. The doctor supposedly ordered a test and examined the man, but when the results came back normal, the doctor did not do any further tests or recommend any further evaluations. Thirteen months later, the husband discovered that he had a cancerous tumor in his bladder.

The wife claims that the cancer remained unidentified and untreated until a different primary care doctor sent them to a urologist. In 2008, the husband and wife filed a lawsuit claiming medical malpractice, and they reached a settlement in that case. The man’s bladder had to be removed, and he eventually lost his life. The new wrongful death case accuses the first doctor as well as other related parties of medical negligence leading to his loss of life.

In cases such as this one, the Ohio family was pursued two different civil suits due to the change in circumstances. While not every situation is the same, anyone who is facing a similar unfortunate event due to medical negligence may be able to take similar legal action. It can be difficult to cope with the circumstances while also trying to prepare and present a wrongful death lawsuit, which is one reason why help is available to deal with these important issues.

Source: limaohio.com, “Woman sues doctor in husband’s death“, Greg Sowinski, Oct. 21, 2014